rich menga books gear search about contact
***Secret FSR Fender guitars? Yes, they exist, and they're right here

big monitor part 2

Yesterday my 24-inch monitor arrived.

New Monitor Day is not a day of celebration for me but rather something that can best be described as a 4-step process.

  1. Relief. "Now that this thing is bought I don't have to buy another one for good long while."
  2. Frustration. Hours are spent adjusting it to get it the luminance and color correct.
  3. Disappointment. I will always find things wrong because I've never had a 'perfect' monitor in my life and don't think I'll ever have one.
  4. Acceptance. "The thing is bought. It's configured the best I can get it. It's better than what I had. Time to get back to work."

I grew up on tube TVs and tube monitors, and the color from them to me looks correct, meaning I've never had an LCD monitor that looked right. At best, I can get it mostly-right and just deal with it. It doesn't matter how much was spent on the thing because thin-film just can't reproduce color like a tube can. Never could and never will.

With a tube-type, I could have the thing set up exactly to my liking in a matter of minutes and leave it that way pretty much for the life of the monitor. With LCD as I've said, it takes me hours. I have to mess around with both OSD and software controls, tweak, tweak, tweak and tweak some more, test with on-screen color cards.. ugh. Very annoying.

The good and bad stuff

No dead pixels on power-on. Very good. And hopefully none will develop for the life of the monitor.

I definitely confirmed that my BenQ was legitimately fuzzy with the way it was rendering fonts, as every font rendered the ASUS VE248H is very crisp and clear.

I also confirmed the BenQ's backlight is definitely showing it's age. The ASUS can easily produce a stark white, but even at max setting, the BenQ simply can't do it anymore. At best it's slightly yellow. Doesn't matter what you set for color, Kelvin temp, gamma or what-have-you, you're going to see some yellow.

True to the reviews I read, the ASUS has a massive ghosting problem. But I also knew about the hidden menu that allows you to turn "OverDrive" off and cures the ghosting 100%, which it does.

You can fit a lot of stuff in a 1920x1080 display, let me tell you. Using a browser full-screen in that res is a bit ridiculous, but I have a program to resize my browser window to 1200x960.

I genuinely appreciate having 30 extra pixels on the vertical (my previous was 1050, bumped to 1080).

I like the fact I can sit back more due to a crisp font display.

There's no gamma OSD control on the ASUS. Fixed with software control, but still.. stupid that it's not there.

I think 24-inch is too big for a desktop. Honestly. Should've went with a 22 or 23. Oh, well. I'll get used to it.

The display on the ASUS is so good that I now consider my netbook's display absolute junk. Yes, I can get a stark white out of the netbook, but the color controls are just way too simplistic to get any good bright color out of it.

My eyes are all bugged out from all the monitor-adjusting I've been doing, but I think I'm done with my tweaking. Hopefully.

Back to work.

image
Best ZOOM R8 tutorial book
highly rated, get recording quick!

111206

More articles to check out

  1. Fender 75th Anniversary Stratocaster confusion
  2. Are there any real advantages to a headless guitar?
  3. Telecaster is a good example of a one-and-done guitar
  4. The guitars I still want that I haven't owned yet
  5. Casio W735HB (I wish this strap was offered on G-SHOCK)
  6. EART guitars are really stepping it up
  7. Using a Garmin GPS in 2021
  8. Converting to 24 hour time
  9. The best audio tester for your song recordings is your phone
  10. 5 awesome Casio watches you never see