rich menga books gear search about contact
***Secret FSR Fender guitars? Yes, they exist, and they're right here

How to find a pair of jeans that actually fits right (for men)

Men's Jeans

You'd be surprised how difficult this is.

This post is actually a diet update, and the new troubles I've been encountering being a slimmer man when it comes to clothes shopping. I'll get back to writing about guitar stuff soon, not to worry.

At this point, the jean size that fits me correct is 32x30 (waist x inseam US measurement, in inches.) However, only a very specific jean type fits me correct. More on that in a moment.

I used to wear 38x29 when I was fat. Did I grow an inch taller? No. My shape changed, and I finally started buying jeans that look correct.

Whether you're big or small, short or tall, there are certain things a man has to know to find jeans that actually fit right.

Get a cloth tape measure

This is a tape measure that clothiers use. You need this to measure the waist and the inseam, as well as measuring above the waist for buying shirts (which I may cover in a another article later.)

What you will notice straight away is that what your true waist measurement is will not match what the label on the jeans state at all because of this thing known as vanity sizing. And the only way to get around this to find a proper fitting pair is to try on many pairs when at the store.

Know the difference between "regular fit" and "relaxed fit"

A relaxed fit specifically adds more fabric in the rear, and the leg openings are also usually slightly wider.

In other words, relaxed is for big-ass overweight guys; regular is for everyone else.

If you don't wear boots, don't wear "boot cut"

Jeans labeled as being boot cut have the leg openings flared out at the bottom specifically to go around boots. If you wear boots, wear a boot cut jean. If you wear sneakers or regular shoes, don't, because otherwise you'll have way too much jean material flopping around the ankles.

Carpenter jeans suck. Don't wear them unless you need them.

Carpenter jeans have extra long pockets and usually a very loose fit specifically so you can fit tools in said pockets.

Without anything in the pockets, however, it's a bad look and can even be dangerous, because I guarantee that the hammer loop(s) on the side will get caught on something.

Unless you specifically need them for on-the-job stuff, don't wear these.

Try at least 3 different brands, with 2 of each brand

No two jean companies build jeans the same way. The only way to really get a really good fit is to pick out 3 pair from 3 different brands, grab 2 of each and then hit the dressing room.

Yes, this means you will be going into the dressing room with 6 pairs of jeans.

Embarrassed? Get that out of your head. Follow the next step.

Don't be afraid of the dressing room

The guy who buys jeans and never uses the dressing room first to test the fit is easy to spot, because he looks like he's wearing clown pants. Not only is he wearing jeans that are too big and too baggy, but he's also wearing a belt at least two sizes too big. That guy simply never learned to test a fit for anything and looks like a complete fool because of that lack of knowledge.

The really sad part is that most guys don't like the dressing room and consider it a waste of time. And yes, this is why you almost never see men in the dressing room area.

I used to be that way, but not anymore.

When I go to a department store to buy jeans now, I will routinely hit the dressing room with 4 to 6 pairs under my arm. And when I leave, I have jeans that I am certain will fit correct. True, the fit will change after a wash or two, but even so, I am still certain they will still fit.

What do I find most difficult about getting a correct fit?

Due to the fact no two jean companies build jeans the same way, that's difficult part #1. Difficult part #2 is finding something in my 32x30 jean size I like.

Most store clothing departments cater to their most popular demographic, which is overweight people. But I'm not overweight.

In my local area, a pair of 32x30 jeans is one of the least available, and can be difficult to find in a "classic regular fit straight leg" configuration. And even when I do find something like that, I still have to try on different brands just to get a pair that fits like it's supposed to - assuming I find anything in a color I like.

I've not had to resort to purchasing online-only for jeans just yet, but that time may come with the fatter America gets.

For button-down casual shirts, I have a very difficult time finding anything that fits correct. For that, I probably will have to go online-only soon. That's sad, but worth it because life is too short to go through it with clothes that don't fit.

image
Best ZOOM R8 tutorial book
highly rated, get recording quick!

151214

More articles to check out

  1. Ibanez does a "Negative Antigua" finish
  2. The guitar some buy in threes because they can: Grote GT-150
  3. You're not allowed to change a brake light in a new car?
  4. Unexpected surprise, Casio F201
  5. Why the Epiphone Explorer is better than the Gibson (for now)
  6. You should surround yourself in guitar luxury
  7. Forgotten Gibson: 1983 Map Guitar
  8. Casio MTP-V003, the one everyone missed
  9. Just for the look: Peavey Solo guitar amp
  10. Spacehunter, that '80s movie when 3D was a thing